Date Name

Carry on up the cyber

Universities are often porous and vulnerable organisations to cyber security breaches, and have tended to find it difficult to implement consistent security measures. It’s time to get our act together.

The new foes are the old ones: lies and ignorance

The science and research community must take a critical look at itself to take the fight to the post-facts, anti-scientific world. Rolf Tarrach, former President of the University of Luxembourg, lays down the challenge.

Business schools are feeling the Brexit heat

One fifth of the UK’s students are studying in business schools, and EU and international students studying business are worth £3.2 billion to the UK economy. Angus Laing looks at the challenges ahead post-Brexit.

UKPRN and how to tell which institution is which

With multiple agencies and multiple formats of providing information, how can we tell universities apart and how can we understand trends? It’s probably about time the government and the sector agreed to use the same standard.

Diversifying delivery in higher education

How are innovative alternative models of higher education being developed in the UK, and what are the barriers to further innovation? Joy Carter introduces the latest inquiry from the Higher Education Commission.

Looking after those student consumers

Following the recent CMA ruling at the University of East Anglia, Registrarism asks if the new regime is beginning to overreach in its quest to regulate universities.

You only get what you pay for. Or do you?

Following a recent ruling by the CMA, Jim Dickinson argues that students are quite right to demand value for money, a decent amount of contact hours, and a fairer service all round.

The case for a Scottish (Blue) Bell

The Bell Review was disappointingly light on consideration of the devolved nations. Alastair Robertson argues that it is time for a similar rationalisation of Scotland’s distinctive sector agencies.

International students and the power of Open Doors data

The UK sector should look to the US for tools to better understand the international student market and the social and economic benefits it brings to local communities and regions, argues Joe Avison.