Date Name

What about public goods in higher education?

“It is notable that high fees reduce both the net private benefits and the public benefits of higher education.” – Simon Marginson lays out some of the economic arguments for a sector finance rethink.

BrHExit: The view from Dublin

Malcolm Byrne of the Higher Education Authority offers a Irish perspective on the concerns and opportunities arising from Brexit for universities and colleges.

Dangerous acts and dogs’ breakfasts

The Higher Education and Research Act – was it really all that? David Kernohan argues that the claims of generational significance are dogging attempts at radical reform.

Is there still a role for validation?

Yes, answers the OU’s Phil Berry, who argues that a validation arrangement can benefit alternative HE and established universities – serving to build a better quality sector.

HE Power List 2017: People power

Power List judge Judy Friedberg discusses – from the election to the NSS boycott – the rise and rise of student power.

HE Power List 2017: The void

Power List judge Robin Middlehurst looks deep into the echoing emptiness at the heart of higher education policy.

Yet More Dumb University Rankings

Paul Greatrix returns to the subject of dumb university rankings, taking in everything from the effect of “dry” campus policies on the crime rate to the proximity to campus of popular cut-price chains of public houses.

Time to open the door on sector diversity

The sector is diverse, but it could offer more choices of delivery methods to support the needs of a wider range of learners. Paul Feldman of Jisc, a member of the Higher Education Commission, introduces their recent report.

On senior pay, the ball is in the sector’s court

OfS Chair Sir Michael Barber encourages the sector to get their house in order regarding value for money, as he looks towards the formal existence of the new sector regulator in the new year.

The golden triangle of retention

We should move beyond the educational deficit model when we consider retention, argues University of Lincoln vice chancellor Mary Stuart.

In defence of independent learning

With contact hours and teaching intensity in the forefront of policymaking, has the argument for independent learning been lost? George Roberts thinks not.