Date Name

The new foes are the old ones: lies and ignorance

The science and research community must take a critical look at itself to take the fight to the post-facts, anti-scientific world. Rolf Tarrach, former President of the University of Luxembourg, lays down the challenge.

Diversifying delivery in higher education

How are innovative alternative models of higher education being developed in the UK, and what are the barriers to further innovation? Joy Carter introduces the latest inquiry from the Higher Education Commission.

You only get what you pay for. Or do you?

Following a recent ruling by the CMA, Jim Dickinson argues that students are quite right to demand value for money, a decent amount of contact hours, and a fairer service all round.

The case for a Scottish (Blue) Bell

The Bell Review was disappointingly light on consideration of the devolved nations. Alastair Robertson argues that it is time for a similar rationalisation of Scotland’s distinctive sector agencies.

The ancient argument, royal charters and universities

If an institution is not functioning properly or meeting regulatory requirements, why should an ancient charter exempt them from possible closure or intervention? Catherine Boyd looks a the furore over Royal Charters.

Prudence and privilege in the HE Bill debate

The current battles in the Lords may secure some constructive amendments to the HE Bill, but it would be politically unwise for the upper house to completely scupper the legislation.

Stern times ahead for REF game players

As the REF2021 consultation gets into gear, Martin McQuillan argues that tnstitutions and academics who support Stern’s reforms to the REF will soon regret their masochism.

Lessons from the A47 (and the university bubble)

Spending time on the road in places that university seems remote, Jim Dickinson has been thinking about life outside the HE bubble and how following Brexit, Trump and the rest, we might reframe the way we think about our communities.

Precarious work is no longer atypical in academia

Jonathan White gets behind the numbers on casual and precarious employment in universities, and explains why trade unions and employers are struggling to see eye-to-eye on the issue.

Could TEF be good news for disabled students?

The use of split metrics in the TEF could incentivise universities to do more to support disabled students’ attainment and employment prospects, and perhaps make up some of the way for recent cuts to DSA, argues Robert McLaren.

The TEF is a statistical wonderland

Should the top prizes in TEF be benchmarked for a university’s entry tariff? Tony Strike argues they should not, and instead that Gold should mean ‘best’, and not just ‘better than expected’.

It’s time for bursaries to demonstrate their impact

Whether bursaries actually work at widening access has long been a controversial topic. Les Ebdon writes how OFFA has introduced a new tool to help universities evaluate bursaries’ impact, which will be required for future access agreements.