The Covid-19 pandemic is changing how students access learning resources. Students learning remotely have had to be able to link to key resources from within their virtual learning environment. The physical university library will certainly make a triumphant comeback post-pandemic – but the more accessible and flexible e-resources and textbooks will play a much greater role in the next normal than they did before. This also offers the possibility of rapidly increasing knowledge and understanding of students’ needs and behaviours when it comes to engaging with learning resources.

The acceleration of what was previously a gradual shift towards a more hybrid model of learning resource provision has created major tensions in the academic e-books market. Libraries argue that publishers are setting prices too high, academics are concerned that they cannot use the best materials to support learning, students complain they cannot access the resources they need at the price they are able to pay, and publishers worry that their business models are not fit for purpose.

We don’t know exactly what the future should look like, but we know things are changing more rapidly than anyone had anticipated. This Wonkhe @ Home event, in partnership with Kortext, will be a “micro-commission” on learning resources in which our expert commissioners, supported by you, the attendees, will hear the evidence on the changing needs of students, academics and university libraries, the available evidence of student engagement with learning resources, and where the gaps are, and tackle the thorniest of questions – who should pay for learning resources?

Agenda

09.30 Meet the commissioners

09.50 How is learning resource usage changing in the disciplines and in pedagogy?

10.40 Break

11.00 What do we know about student engagement with learning resources – and what don’t we know?

11.45 Who should pay for learning resources? Exploring the e-book market from all sides.

12.30 Initial reflections from commissioners

12.45 Close

Default title

Supporters

The Covid-19 pandemic is changing how students access learning resources. Students learning remotely have had to be able to link to key resources from within their virtual learning environment. The physical university library will certainly make a triumphant comeback post-pandemic – but the more accessible and flexible e-resources and textbooks will play a much greater role in the next normal than they did before. This also offers the possibility of rapidly increasing knowledge and understanding of students’ needs and behaviours when it comes to engaging with learning resources.

The acceleration of what was previously a gradual shift towards a more hybrid model of learning resource provision has created major tensions in the academic e-books market. Libraries argue that publishers are setting prices too high, academics are concerned that they cannot use the best materials to support learning, students complain they cannot access the resources they need at the price they are able to pay, and publishers worry that their business models are not fit for purpose.

We don’t know exactly what the future should look like, but we know things are changing more rapidly than anyone had anticipated. This Wonkhe @ Home event, in partnership with Kortext, will be a “micro-commission” on learning resources in which our expert commissioners, supported by you, the attendees, will hear the evidence on the changing needs of students, academics and university libraries, the available evidence of student engagement with learning resources, and where the gaps are, and tackle the thorniest of questions – who should pay for learning resources?

Agenda

09.30 Meet the commissioners

09.50 How is learning resource usage changing in the disciplines and in pedagogy?

10.40 Break

11.00 What do we know about student engagement with learning resources – and what don’t we know?

11.45 Who should pay for learning resources? Exploring the e-book market from all sides.

12.30 Initial reflections from commissioners

12.45 Close

Default title

Supporters

Tickets

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Speakers

  • Michelle Morgan

    Dean of Students, University of East London

    Michelle is a HE student transition and experience specialist and practitioner. She develops initiatives based on pragmatic and practical research to improve the experience of students and staff. The impact of herr work is to enable students to succeed to the best of their ability in a high quality HE environment that challenges and supports … Continued

  • Libby Homer

    Director of Student and Library Services, Anglia Ruskin University

    Director of Student and Library Services, Anglia Ruskin University and chair of the content strategy group, SCONUL

  • Ramy Badrie

    Vice President Education, Brighton Students' Union and student panel member, Office for Students

    Ramy is the lead representative for the academic interests of 20,000 students, his role encompasses the function of an elected representative, company director and trustee for Brighton Students’ Union, a multi-million pound charity organisation. His membership on the University of Brightons Board of Governors, has allowed him to develop a sound knowledge of organisational strategy, … Continued

  • Joanne Lymn

    Head of School, Faculty of Medicine & Health Sciences, University of Nottingham

    Lord Dearing Award winner in both 2006 and 2011. National Teaching Fellowship awarded by Higher Education Academy 2013.  Substantial undergraduate and post-graduate teaching experience including large lecture and small group teaching, the use of seminar, tutorials, problem-based learning and laboratory practicals, and significant PhD/DPhil supervision experience (Oxford University, Imperial College London & University of Nottingham). … Continued

  • Miceál Barden

    Dean of Arts, Business and Social Sciences, University of Wolverhampton

    A graduate of the Universities of Hull and King’s College London, Miceál was a researcher for the Standing Advisory Commission on Human Rights in Northern Ireland, then at the Law Commission in 1989 where he worked on law reform proposals. He started his HE career as a lecturer at East London Polytechnic and then Staffordshire … Continued

  • Jo Webb

    Head of Library Learning and Teaching Support, Sheffield Hallam University

    Jo Webb is Head of Library Learning and Teaching Support at Sheffield Hallam University, She has been responsible for academic liaison, curriculum support and resource management at a number of universities, including senior roles at Queen Mary, University of London and De Montfort University. Jo is a Trustee of CILIP, the Library and Information Association, … Continued

  • Melissa Highton

    Director of Learning, Teaching and Web Services and Assistant Principal, University of Edinburgh.

    Dr Highton leads services and projects in support of the University’s strategic priorities for digital and distance learning on global platforms, blended learning, virtual learning environments, technology enhanced learning spaces, the digital student experience and use of the web for outreach and engagement. She has particular interests in digital skills, 21st century curricula, open educational … Continued

  • Helen Beetham

    Researcher, Institute of Education, University of Wolverhampton

    Helen Beetham is an education consultant, writer, researcher and commentator, who has worked for a number of universities and funders in the UK and overseas. She works particularly in the areas of digital capability, digital citizenship and digital wellbeing, the learning experience, and curriculum design.

  • James Gray

    Founder and CEO, Kortext

    James is the founder and CEO of Kortext. Prior to Kortext James was the owner of Coutts Information Services, which he sold to Ingram Group, where he became CEO of Ingram Digital based out of the USA. On leaving Ingram James returned to the UK to set up Kortext.

  • Kate O’Riordan

    Dean of the School of Media, Arts and Humanities, University of Sussex

    Kate O’Riordan is Professor of Digital Culture and Dean of the School of Media, Arts and Humanities at the University of Sussex. She is the co-author of Furious: Technological Feminism and Digital Futures (Pluto, 2019) with Professor Caroline Bassett and Professor Sarah Kember. She has published widely on digital media and cultures of science and technology including Unreal Objects (Pluto, 2017) and The Genome Incorporated (Ashgate, 2010). She is currently working on sexuality and the algorithmic imaginary, biotechnologies and LGBTQ+ identities.

  • Ichamati Mousamputri

    student, University of Bimingham

    Ichamati is currently a second year undergraduate student of Geography and Urban Planning.She is the Welfare Officer of the International Students’ Association at the University of Birmingham.

  • Alex Lewis

    Analytics and Finance Manager, Kortext

    Coming soon