12 results
Date Name

DLHE: three quarters of graduates in employment

This year’s annual Destination of Leavers from Higher Education in the United Kingdom report from HESA finds that this year’s annual 71 percent of 2013/14 UK and EU leavers were working either in the UK or overseas six months after graduation.

Universities on target to meet access requirements

The Office for Fair Access have released their annual Outcomes of access agreement monitoring. The report finds that Universities and colleges in England are on course to meet 90% of targets in their access agreements, and one in three targets has been met three years ahead of deadline.

Record highs for university applications

Almost 600,000 students applied to university in 2015, a 2 per cent increase on the year before. More young people from disadvantaged backgrounds are applying to higher education but there are less applications from older age groups and the gap between men and women applying to university continues to rise.

The strange death of student number controls

In December 2013 in his Annual Autumn Statement the UK Chancellor George Osbourne announced the end of the Student Number Control (SNC) regime for English higher education institutions, thereby removing the cap on places that had been in place since 2009. But how and why did we get here? Was this the Government’s plan all along? Colin McCaig builds on his recent research to take us on a journey of paradoxical adventures in higher education market making.

New federalism and UK higher education

Continuing his series on regulation and higher education, Andrew Boggs looks at the implications for UK HE from the renewed focussed on creating a federal UK following the Scottish Independence Referendum. Devolution poses many challenges for policymakers, and for higher education the implications are enormous. But with great challenges, comes interesting opportunities for the sector to draw on international experiences and recast relationships with the nations that they are a part of, as well as with the United Kingdom.

Cold spots rebooted

In 2008, the then Secretary of State at DIUS John Denham announced his ‘university challenge’ to plug the ‘cold spots’ of HE provision in England. The idea was to create HE ‘centres’ in partnership rather than brand new universities, although the media widely reported it as “Croydon planning to join Cambridge as a university town” etc. Today the idea makes a (sort of) return.

Uncertainty versus risk in HE regulation

Continuing his series on HE regulation, Andrew Boggs of the former Higher Education Better Regulation Group examines a new approach which new higher education regulation should employ. Particularly, Andrew will consider uncertainty-based, rather than risk-based, approaches to regulation – a meaningful difference that will require greater trust between regulators and providers and investment in human intelligence at the expense of data dependence.

The future of Higher National Diplomas

Anyone interested in higher education funding and regulation should take some time out in the next few weeks to think about Higher National Diplomas. The plan recently announced by BIS to transfer HNDs and HNCs out of the higher education funding system represents an important moment in policy for both HE and FE. Julian Gravatt looks at the long history of higher nationals and the implications of BIS’ latest proposals for funding and regulation.

Creating a regulatory system in English HE

The recent movement of teaching funding from public grants to student fees has triggered a wider discussion about reform of the higher education regulatory system in England. In this piece, Andrew Boggs of the Higher Education Better Regulation Group looks at the challenges posed by designing a single regulatory regime and what may need to be considered by policymakers in the next Parliament as they look towards ironing out regulation of English HE.

London Met – outsourcing? or something else?

I carry with me at all times a 2009 report for Universities UK prepared by the legal firm Eversheds. Why? On page 7 of ‘Developing future university structures’, you will find a diagram entitled ‘A model for university buyouts’. I suggest you look at that diagram and then read the stories about London Metropolitan University’s intentions to ‘outsource’ all staff besides teaching staff and vice-chancellor. What they are doing is something new; they aim to create a vehicle to run universities across the UK.