Date Name

A brief history of higher education data

The UK’s higher education data infrastructure is the envy of the world and has unlikely origins in the conclusion of the Second World War. Andy Youell takes us on a brief and fascinating history.

A positive outcome? Steps towards a new DLHE

There was consensus and conflict within the sector over how to best measure graduate outcomes. Rachel Hewitt takes us through the highlights of the new DLHE consultation responses.

Are you data capable?

Today sees the publication of two significant reports that attempt to find some answers to some of the big questions about data capability that the sector – and the economy – are facing. Data wonk Andy Youell sets out the challenges.

Beginning a revolution in data collection

Andy Youell writes on possibly the best opportunity to address data gathering in higher education in years – a new far-reaching consultation from HESA who are conducting a fundamental think about the sector’s relationship with data.

Capturing the future of graduate outcomes

HESA has made significant strides forward in designing a new graduate destinations survey to replace DLHE. Dan Cook gives us an update on the decisions made so far.

Data capability: a call to action

With so many data-related changes emerging across the landscape, a failure to engage with this agenda is likely to leave institutions struggling with data problems for years to come. Andy Youell argues that the sector now needs a sea-change in the way it thinks about data in universities.

Data governance – not fun (for most), but vital (for all)

Data governance can be fluffy and difficult to implement, but it’s something universities cannot afford not to have. Marian Hilditch outlines her recent visit to HESA to explain their work in this area.

Data-riffic! What does data tell us about UK higher education in 2017?

More data is available about universities than ever before, and new software means it can be visualised to tell new stories about our sector. David Morris looks at data on TEF, REF, widening participation, university finances, and student numbers.

Designing a landscape

Amidst a never-ending storm of technological advances, the HE data landscape is complex, inefficient, bewildering and sometimes painful to be a part of. Andy Youell looks at how we might go about redesigning it.

Digesting the Longitudinal Educational Outcome data

On the day the government releases LEO data showing graduate earnings over time, we take a first look at the data, what it shows and what’s in store as the agenda develops.

Do Vice Chancellors love Cox? The ‘celebrity academic’ – a statistical analysis

You cannot have watched television on a Sunday night in the UK over the past few weeks without witnessing the wonders of Professor Brian Cox, the be-gortexed globetrotting human lens flare that has defined popular physics in 2011. With his rock&roll background, his boyish enthusiasm and charm, and his habit of wearing t-shirts that display a startling level of nipple definition, many hearts have been set a-flutter and the phrase “stellar superfluid” has taken on a whole new layer of meaning.

Employability: Congratulations to the best and ‘worst’ performers…

HESA have recently released the latest DLHE figures showing the destinations of graduates six months after obtaining their degrees. They have sparked headlines about unemployed graduates as well as underemployed graduates – those that can’t find work and those having to take non graduate jobs. Stories on the BBC and in broadsheets from the Guardian to the Telegraph have highlighted up to 1 in 5 graduates unemployed at six months and around 1 in 4 of those in work in jobs that might not require degree level qualifications. These findings come at a time when fees are rising to £9k a year and many commentators can’t resist seeing the data as proof that too many people go to university and that there aren’t the jobs to accommodate them all. Andy Westwood takes a closer look at the data and argues that this is a lazy and potentially damaging view.

Farewell to JACS, and hello to HECoS

JACS codes have been a familiar part of the sector data background, but all is about to change. Andy Youell explains why you should be excited about subject-coding.

Interesting trends in latest UCAS data

UCAS have now published their data for applications to the 15 January deadline. By this stage, almost all school-leavers who are going to apply have applied, and a significant proportion of the overseas and older applicants have also applied. This provides us with a reasonably firm basis for taking stock of this years’ recruitment position.

International students and the power of Open Doors data

The UK sector should look to the US for tools to better understand the international student market and the social and economic benefits it brings to local communities and regions, argues Joe Avison.

Introducing data

In the 21st century, data makes the world go round. It powers enterprise and connectivity, as oil and steam did in the last two centuries. It comes in many varieties and flavours – ‘raw’ data, ‘processed’ data, ‘big’ data, ‘meta’ data, ‘personal’ data, ‘open’ data, ‘unstructured’ data, to name only a handful that are currently significant… | As the sector begins to get its collective head around data, Graeme Wise sets the scene and introduces Wonkhe’s new data blog – a new initiative dedicated to higher education and its relationship with data.

Is Nick Timothy right about graduate salaries? A new look at LEO

The Prime Minister’s former chief wonk has got stuck into the ‘is university worth it?’ debate this morning. It seemed a good reason, combined with A level results day, to present some new ways of looking at graduate salaries data from LEO.

LEO shows how graduate pay has been squeezed

LEO data shows that, when adjusted for inflation, graduates’ pay packets are being significantly squeezed. Jonathan Boys has broken down the data.

Lessons earned – winners and losers from LEO

There are plenty of interesting insights and perspectives to be gained from a day’s worth of analysis of the the new Longitudinal Education Outcomes dataset. David Morris suggests some winners and losers from this release.