35 results
Date Name

You only get what you pay for. Or do you?

Following a recent ruling by the CMA, Jim Dickinson argues that students are quite right to demand value for money, a decent amount of contact hours, and a fairer service all round.

A working class hero is something to be

Students at Oxford’s StHilda’s College have voted to appoint a Class Liberation Officer – something easy to make fun of. But Claire Lynch argues why this shows they are needed more than ever.

Turning students into citizens: a charter for active citizenship

A new GuildHE report shows that social action and active citizenship are an important aspect of higher education. Joy Carter argues that universities must actively demonstrate their social value and the power of community action by staff and students.

Sexual harassment on campus: an alternative view

Claire Reddleman responds to a recent article on sexual harassment on campus, arguing that it is important not to misrepresent the issue or propose inappropriate solutions.

Generation consequence: understanding students’ lives

Students are increasingly isolated and stressed as they worry more about their future than generations that came before them. How can we better understand their lives and how to improve them on campus?

It’s time for real action on the BME attainment gap

Institutions are finally implementing strategies to tackle the black and ethnic minority attainment gap. Helen Barefoot from the University of Hertfordshire and Nona McDuff from Kingston University explain what they are doing.

The student voice is missing from the TEF

Despite the White Paper’s championing of student rights and interests, Alex Pool asks why the collective student voice is not being given a place in the TEF.

The Tragedy of Dave, Prince of Europe

Martin McQuillan argues that to win the EU Referendum, David Cameron now relies on the votes of the same people who have suffered most under his policies. But the alternative could be even worse.

It’s the children who are wrong

Jim Dickinson responds to Jonathan Haidt who argued at the weekend that “young people are demanding a censorship on campus that shuts down argument in a dangerous way”. Is he right?

BME students need more than a place at Oxford

Prime Minister is right to focus on race and to question admissions data. Chris Hall argues that we must not let a media frenzy focussed on one issue, predominantly at one university, distract us from the wider issues that we need to address.

The PM has moved the admissions debate forward

UCU’s Angela Nartey says that, in his intervention on universities and race, the Prime Minister is right that there is something “ingrained, institutional and insidious” about universities today

Who gains from the grumbles?

Steven Jones, lecturer and researcher into higher education responds to an anonymous academic who claims that “My students have paid £9,000 and now they think they own me”.

Happy New Year, Generation K

Who are Generation K and why are they right to fight for a better world in universities today? Jim Dickinson asks whether the increasingly indebted students of today should stand up and be counted despite opposition from those that would sooner dismiss their aspirations for the world they want to create as frivolous or dangerous.

Enhancing student representation systems

Marking the launch of a new report from GuildHE on student engagement, Alex Bols looks at the different behaviours in play that inform the effectiveness of student representation systems.

Redress must be at the heart of future HE regulation

Following the Green Paper’s proposals to create an Office for Students, Jim Dickinson argues that the sector and the government will need to go much further if they intend to properly protect students, and give them a voice.

Time to get real about sexual assault on campus

As the Secretary of State takes action against lad culture on campus, Jim Dickinson argues that the sector needs to take up his challenge but go even further to clear out the perpetrators of sexual violence.

Time to crack down on the payday lenders exploiting students

As NUS and OFFA pull out of a conference taking place today in London due to the inclusion of payday lenders, NUS’ Colum McGuire explains why action must now be taken to crack down on companies that are exploiting student hardship.

Time to rebalance funding, regulation and autonomy

Building on new research from Claire Callender and Paul Temple, Jim Dickinson sets his sights on higher education’s autonomy and a redrawing of the compact that has enabled a failed market.

The changing student experience

When the present English tuition fee regime was being planned, there were plenty of voices from inside universities warning that it would change the nature of the relationship between students and their universities for the worse. Students would, it was feared, become customers rather than partners in an academic enterprise – has this happened? Claire Callender and Paul Temple discuss their new research on the changing student experience.

Universities need a lecture in consumer law

Following a review of universities’ terms and conditions, Which? is calling on the Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) to examine evidence that suggests students are being left open to unfair changes to courses, and that some providers are failing to ensure that their terms are complying with the law.

Students at the heart of the system (when it suits)

Days before the National Student Survey (NSS) goes live, the National College for Teaching and Learning, responsible for overseeing Initial Teacher Training has inexplicably pulled the plug on universities and future students receiving and learning from effective student feedback. One vice chancellor expresses his frustration at this counter-productive and contradictory move.