20 results
Date Name

How do you solve a problem like REF 2021?

‘Whole staff submission’ to the next REF is reputedly a red line for the universities minister. How is this to be reconciled with a sector that believes it is unworkable and undesirable? Martin McQuillan investigates.

In spite of Brexit… reasons for hope in 2017

We’ve heard a lot about the dangers facing universities over the coming months and years, but what about the opportunities? Leila Gouran gives an optimistic take on our challenges.

The new foes are the old ones: lies and ignorance

The science and research community must take a critical look at itself to take the fight to the post-facts, anti-scientific world. Rolf Tarrach, former President of the University of Luxembourg, lays down the challenge.

Stern times ahead for REF game players

As the REF2021 consultation gets into gear, Martin McQuillan argues that tnstitutions and academics who support Stern’s reforms to the REF will soon regret their masochism.

Lessons from the front line of industrial strategy policy

Research, innovation and skills will all be a critical part of the government’s upcoming industrial strategy. Maddalaine Ansell worked on industrial strategy during her time in government and argues that universities must sell themselves as essential national assets for a new industrial plan.

Is it time for a 5* category in the REF?

Will the changes proposed by Lord Stern make it too easy for REF assessments to achieve 100% 4* submissions? Simon Kerridge asks if we need a 5* rating.

A kinder, gentler REF? Reflections on Stern

Reflections to the Stern Review from across the sector, including James Wilsdon, Pam Tatlow, Jamie Arrowsmith, Martin McQuillan, Maddalaine Ansell, and Martin Paul Eve.

Innovation – you’re more than a spin out to me

Taken together, the Green Paper, Nurse Review and Spending Review amount to the biggest overhaul of research and innovation governance and funding structures in 20 years. That means that 2016 is the best shot we’ve had in a long time to create the best environment for a healthy innovation ecosystem

Contemplating a Brexit for UK HE

Getting ahead of the EU referendum debates to come, Emran Mian picks apart four main arguments from the HE sector’s campaign to stay in the EU.

A new manifesto for UK research

As the University Alliance announce a new doctoral training alliance and report in to research and innovation, new Chief Executive Maddalaine Ansell sets out her manifesto for the future of UK research.

The REF: fascinating, flawed and essential

As the 2014 REF results are published, Mark Leach looks at where they sit in the wider effort to fund and support research. With so much on the table in spending review negotiations in the next few years, the next steps will prove critical in shaping the future of the REF exercise and the research base it supports.

Confessions of a concentratist

I have a confession to make. During my days at Russell Group institutions I favoured the research concentration tendency; that is, the view that it would be better if fewer universities were funded by central government to undertake research. I now understand that I was wrong. There, I’ve said it. And I’m sorry.

Debating the future of research

The REF submission deadline has finally arrived. But it’s only the beginning for researchers, departments and universities that have gambled big and need a good result. The results will make or break many universities’ ambitions and long-term strategic plans. The REF’s importance to the sector, or the impact on it cannot be overstated. But it’s not just the REF looming large on policymaker’s minds. With severe pressure on the whole of the BIS budget and many outstanding issues to resolve, will the next Parliament afford the opportunity for a far-reaching debate to help shape the next long term settlement for research and science in the UK?

An innovation and efficiencies pot?

The Government doesn’t quite know what it wants to do with the core and margin policy next year. At the moment their instinct is to run it again on more or less the same terms. Ministers don’t see either AAB or core and margin as permanent features of the system but they are mightily constrained by the short and longer term costs of the student loan book. Furthermore, there are no guarantees that the places top sliced and allocated through the core and margin will definitely be filled – UCAS application data shows that the biggest falls have been from older population groups and those perhaps already in work – both more common in the FE sector that has won most of the places.

Studying popular culture

In the first week of January 2012, Jane Clare Jones – a doctoral student in Philosophy – published an article about the Doctor Who Christmas Special. It appeared on ‘Comment is Free’ section of the online Guardian newspaper, and it was met by multiple responses. Many of the comments were remarkably, and depressingly, similar to… read more