26 results
Date Name

Beyond metrics: An open letter to Sir Michael Barber

The new OfS Chair is famous as a disciple of the Third Way in public services. Shân Wareing makes a plea for the future of HE regulation to adhere to the Fourth Way, a less metrics driven and more inclusive approach.

You only get what you pay for. Or do you?

Following a recent ruling by the CMA, Jim Dickinson argues that students are quite right to demand value for money, a decent amount of contact hours, and a fairer service all round.

The ancient argument, royal charters and universities

If an institution is not functioning properly or meeting regulatory requirements, why should an ancient charter exempt them from possible closure or intervention? Catherine Boyd looks a the furore over Royal Charters.

Prudence and privilege in the HE Bill debate

The current battles in the Lords may secure some constructive amendments to the HE Bill, but it would be politically unwise for the upper house to completely scupper the legislation.

Quality assessment through the looking glass

Following HEFCE publishing its next steps for quality assessment, Gordon McKenzie looks at how far the new system aligns with the Government’s priorities for quality and regulation in HE.

Redress must be at the heart of future HE regulation

Following the Green Paper’s proposals to create an Office for Students, Jim Dickinson argues that the sector and the government will need to go much further if they intend to properly protect students, and give them a voice.

Green Paper calls in the architects

With the Green Paper merging HE bodies and putting others at risk, Gordon McKenzie asks some important unanswered questions about how the architecture of the new system will come together, protecting the best elements of the today’s system.

Balancing the future of the quality system

Alongside QAA’s response to the Quality Assessment Review, Ian Kimber, Director of Quality Development, shares thoughts on the ongoing process, and asks questions about how a Teaching Excellence Framework might work.

A tale of two quality systems?

As HEFCE publish their long awaiting consultation on the future of quality assessment, Mark Leach revisits the proposals, the debates around them, the early sector reaction and a muddled relationship with the emerging Teaching Excellence Framework.

A quiet plea for pluralism in regulation

Following speculation that HEFCE could bring quality assurance in house, Jess Bridgman calls for regulatory powers to be shared amongst different actors.

Regulation should be more independent, not less

As rumours fly of the sector abandoning QAA and quality review, Jim Dickinson re-assesses his own view about quality and regulation of universities – and calls for stronger more independent regulation.

Time to end the messy status quo

In his first report as Director of HEPI, Nick Hillman calls for an end to the messy status quo that has led to fragmentation across UK higher education and it’s regulatory regime. He calls for policymakers to set out where they stand and bring the debate forward despite difficult politics to settle the many outstanding questions that lay before us.

Protecting students through regulation

On the blog last week, Jim Dickinson criticised the Higher Education Commission’s recent report in to HE regulation for not including enough protection for students. Now Jess Bridgman, a researcher to the Commission, responds to the charge that the report failed students and shows why its recommendations are underpinned by a need to provide good regulation for the benefit of students.

Regulation for all (apart from students)

Another week, another report is published on the gaps in regulation left by the Government’s interesting new take on consumer-focused reforms; triple fees, publish a white paper offering protections, fail miserably to implement them – in that order. Jim Dickinson takes a look at the HE Commission’s report on regulation and finds little new protection for students.

UKBA’s student immigration proposals have no intellectual coherence

The immigration minister Damian Green gave a speech yesterday to the think tank Reform explaining the proposals set out by the UK Border Agency in its consultation on student visas.

The legal firm Pennington’s, who are experts in immigration law, suggested this week that the consultation itself could be illegal.

The Conservatives pledged to lower net migration to the ‘tens of thousands’ in their General Election manifesto. Since taking office they have realized that through a quirk of data processing that counts student in net migration figures even though very few international students take up permanent residence in the UK, enacting this pledge would require drastic cuts to international student numbers.