13 results
Date Name

Labour Party Conference 2016: Four Days that Shook the Wirral

The Labour Party conference has come to an end and the HE wonks that were there have headed home. Despite the awkwardness, Martin McQuillan stayed in the house during the family domestic to get a grip on The World Transformed.

Critics of the graduate tax are shouting at straw men

Jim Dickinson responds to the legions of public critics of Owen Smith’s plans for a graduate tax, arguing that there are just as many problems with the current fees and ‘vouchers’ system.

The graduate tax: higher education’s zombie idea

Owen Smith’s revival of the graduate tax idea is the latest attempt to find an ugly compromise between tuition fees and free education. Politicians need to chose one or the other, argues Will Cooling.

The left is lost on higher education

Emran Mian argues that the left is offering no constructive alternative to the government’s market-led agenda in HE, and thus have very little of use to add to the debate.

Lost Labour’s love is not higher education

Martin McQuillan argues that with an HE White Paper and a Bill heading to Parliament, the Labour party’s opposition has never been more important. But they’ve been nowhere on HE in quite some time.

Labour Pains: Corbyn and the University

On Saturday Jeremy Corbyn was elected as leader of the Labour Party. He campaigned on a promise to abolish university tuition fees and fund higher education through direct taxation. Martin McQuillan looks at what it all means for higher education and the previous consensus on HE funding.

Winners and losers from £6,000 fees

A fortnight ago, the higher education choice at the forthcoming general election became clearer as a result of Labour’s policy announcement. Graeme Wise returns to the issue to assess the winners and losers from the £6,000 fees policy.

A small sigh of relief?

Following Labour’s announcement that they would lower fees from 9k to 6k, Alistiar Jarvis looks at why the policy isn’t nearly as bad as some in the sector had feared – but warns of challenges on the road ahead.

The art of the implausible

A week after vice chancellors intervened in the General Election campaign with an attack on Labour’s tentative proposal to lower tuition fees – citing its ‘implausibility’ – Martin McQuillan argues that the intervention was a mistake that may now backfire.

Labour higher education funding policy 101

On the day Universities UK launches a major political intervention in to the HE funding debate, Mark Leach takes a look at the current state of Labour Party fees policy. How we got here and what the options are for a way out that satisfies the increasingly difficult political and economic climate.

(It’s) Hard Labour?

Labour’s 2015 position on higher education policy – of all the three main political parties – is still probably the hardest to predict. But this is not necessarily because of the affordability of a £6k or even a £5k fee (the IPPR costed it at nearly £2billion up front – even more for a graduate tax – an awful lot to spend in a cash constrained election). Andy Westwood continues his series marking party conference season and takes a look at the state of Labour’s HE policy.

Are we heading for a breakdown?

The Coalition Government is in terminal decline. Its sense of purpose has dissipated and internal politics threaten to derail the whole enterprise. The higher education policy circus that came to town in 2010 reflects more than ever the tensions within the Coalition and the bizarre, inconsistent and occasionally bad policy-making that stems from this faltering political arrangement. The Coalition’s expiry date is May 2015, and despite the entire Government machine fixing its sights on that date, things may fall apart before then.