16 results
Date Name

Critics of degree apprenticeships need a reality check

In light of recent criticisms that growth in degree apprenticeships is a cause of concern, Greg Wade of UUK defends the qualification as a good fit for employers and a solution to the skills shortage.

Are business schools fit for the future?

Simon Collinson explores the future of business education, as part of a collection celebrating twenty-five years of the Chartered Association of Business Schools.

Differential fees need scrutiny, not sympathy

Tom Bailey offers a response to Dean Machin’s case for differential fees by subject and institution, arguing that it would be unfair, impractical and imprudent.

What if there isn’t a skills deficit?

David Morris argues that not far in the future, the sector may not be able to rely on old assumptions about their role in driving skills and so need to start thinking now about how universities should to adapt to shifting economic trends.

Human capital: let’s talk about graduate outcomes

Following the recent IFS report into graduate earnings, Charlie Ball discusses the significant implications for the sector, and previews the forthcoming consultation on the future of the DLHE survey – an opportunity to get this right for the future.

Winners and losers in the current system

There is no doubt that, as with most changes, the £9,000 fee system introduced in England in 2012-13 created winners and losers. We know that applications are back up for full-time undergraduates – and we know this includes students from non-traditional backgrounds, which is great. But that is not the whole story. On the day the Public Accounts Committee confirm the rising costs of writing off loans, Libby Hackett looks at the winners and losers in the current system, and calls for a fundamental rethink.

The student as labourer-consumer

One of the odder beliefs that our culture seems to have developed about markets is the idea of market efficiency. Specifically, the idea that – given the publicly available information presented at the time of action – the actions of any given player in a market are unable to offer greater efficiency than the average of the actions of all players within that market. Or, to stick this in non-economist language, if everyone has access to the same info then no-one has an advantage.