38 results
Date Name

Dangerous acts and dogs’ breakfasts

The Higher Education and Research Act – was it really all that? David Kernohan argues that the claims of generational significance are dogging attempts at radical reform.

Is Britain’s university system really a timebomb?

Mike Ratcliffe defuses that UK2020 report, and offers a critique of the way it has been constructed. He argues that we need to address these arguments, despite their low quality, as they are continuing to catch the attention of the media.

A real step change for fair access

As the work of the Office for Fair Access begins to transfer to the new Office for Students, Les Ebdon offers his perspective on the way the new body will need to approach this vitally important issue.

The ancient argument, royal charters and universities

If an institution is not functioning properly or meeting regulatory requirements, why should an ancient charter exempt them from possible closure or intervention? Catherine Boyd looks a the furore over Royal Charters.

Prudence and privilege in the HE Bill debate

The current battles in the Lords may secure some constructive amendments to the HE Bill, but it would be politically unwise for the upper house to completely scupper the legislation.

Why I amended the Higher Education and Research Bill

As the Higher Education and Research Bill reaches the end of its journey in the House of Commons, Universities Minister Jo Johnson explains why the government has amended the Bill and looks at what’s next.

The OfS must not overlook FE colleges

Julian Gravatt of the Association Colleges gives his take on the Higher Education and Research Bill and wonders if the OfS will account for all types of student.

The HE Bill is not dead and should not be killed off

The Chief Executive of Guild HE argues that the HE Bill is a matter of necessity for the higher education sector and can make it through Parliament before the burden of Brexit really begins.

In this time of chaos, the HE Bill should be paused

The shockwaves following the Brexit vote continue to be felt. As the world turns its attention to this issue, Mark Leach argues that the Higher Education and Research Bill should be paused or killed altogether.

The student voice is missing from the TEF

Despite the White Paper’s championing of student rights and interests, Alex Pool asks why the collective student voice is not being given a place in the TEF.

The left is lost on higher education

Emran Mian argues that the left is offering no constructive alternative to the government’s market-led agenda in HE, and thus have very little of use to add to the debate.

Keep calm and speculate wildly

Does anyone really know what’s going on? Martin McQuillan thinks not, warns against believing in false prophets and wonders if there are bigger things in the world for universities to worry about than the outcomes of Green Paper.

Level playing fields are better than handicaps

Although the Government has committed to boosting participation in higher education amongst disadvantaged groups, will the policies enacted match the rhetoric?

Why TEF must measure employability not employment

Marking the report of his HEPI pamphlet ‘Employability: Degrees of Value’, Johnny Rich argues that the government is wrong to focus on measures of employment in the TEF and instead should be looking for student employability in the great scramble to measure teaching excellence.

TEF and the importance of university teachers

In all the discussion about the Teaching Excellence Framework, the voice of teachers is getting lost. What can the HE sector learn from schools and their more organic and vibrant community shaping their future?

Spending Review: In the Bleak Midwinter?

Reviewing the Spending Review, Andy Westwood looks through George Osborne’s greatest hits and biggest gifts, and also some of his biggest challenges to higher education.

Redress must be at the heart of future HE regulation

Following the Green Paper’s proposals to create an Office for Students, Jim Dickinson argues that the sector and the government will need to go much further if they intend to properly protect students, and give them a voice.