58 results
Date Name

Are headline writers getting it wrong on fees?

As the nation’s press runs away with stories on tuition fees, Steven Jones argues that much of the subtleties of the system – both its faults and benefits – are being lost in the debate.

Is the tuition fee system now under threat?

There are noises from deep within all major political parties now expressing concern about tuition fees. Are the political winds starting to blow against the current system?

The real value of abolishing tuition fees in England

There are lots of good reasons for the higher education sector to support a proposal to abolish tuition fees. Christopher Newfield makes the case for reframing the debate about university funding in the UK and the US.

Precarious work is no longer atypical in academia

Jonathan White gets behind the numbers on casual and precarious employment in universities, and explains why trade unions and employers are struggling to see eye-to-eye on the issue.

Critics of the graduate tax are shouting at straw men

Jim Dickinson responds to the legions of public critics of Owen Smith’s plans for a graduate tax, arguing that there are just as many problems with the current fees and ‘vouchers’ system.

The graduate tax: higher education’s zombie idea

Owen Smith’s revival of the graduate tax idea is the latest attempt to find an ugly compromise between tuition fees and free education. Politicians need to chose one or the other, argues Will Cooling.

Scottish and English records on access should be compared

The access record of universities in Scotland has been disappointing, and the Scottish Government needs to stop sidelining the problem. Lucy Hunter Blackburn argues that despite that the comparison with England holds up, despite what the politicians are saying.

The left is lost on higher education

Emran Mian argues that the left is offering no constructive alternative to the government’s market-led agenda in HE, and thus have very little of use to add to the debate.

Differential fees need scrutiny, not sympathy

Tom Bailey offers a response to Dean Machin’s case for differential fees by subject and institution, arguing that it would be unfair, impractical and imprudent.

Short-termism is putting Northern Irish universities at risk

In Northern Ireland, public funding cuts to the higher education sector are jeopardising the economic future of a region that has been blighted by relatively high levels of unemployment and deprivation coupled with low levels of productivity and economic activity.

Going part time

On the publication of the Conservative think tank Bright Blue’s report on part time higher education, Open University vice chancellor Peter Horrocks looks at the proposals in their political context.

Universities should spend their cashable reserves

Continuing the debate started by their report published on Monday, Jonathan Simons responds to the critics – and argues universities do indeed have reserves which could be used if policy and funding is rebalanced to save FE.

Proposals to cut HE budgets are a recipe for disaster

Responding to the Policy Exchange report published today, Karmjit Kaur of UUK argues that the proposals to cut HE in favour of technical education would damage the economy and row back much of the progress made by universities in recent years.