15 results
Date Name

Critics of degree apprenticeships need a reality check

In light of recent criticisms that growth in degree apprenticeships is a cause of concern, Greg Wade of UUK defends the qualification as a good fit for employers and a solution to the skills shortage.

Graduate wellbeing and the transition to work

On World Mental Health Day (10th October 2017) Student Minds published a report on the well-being of young graduates making the transition from university into the workforce.

Unpaid Internships – it’s still not what you know

Sally Holt, wonk-aspirant and former aspirations coordinator at a Hartlepool school, argues that the continued practice of unpaid internships is undoing all the good work by the education sector to make life chances more fair.

What if there isn’t a skills deficit?

David Morris argues that not far in the future, the sector may not be able to rely on old assumptions about their role in driving skills and so need to start thinking now about how universities should to adapt to shifting economic trends.

Human capital: let’s talk about graduate outcomes

Following the recent IFS report into graduate earnings, Charlie Ball discusses the significant implications for the sector, and previews the forthcoming consultation on the future of the DLHE survey – an opportunity to get this right for the future.

Employability: metrics and definitions

Responding to Johnny Rich’s piece before Christmas which argued that the coming TEF should measure employability rather than employment outcomes, Doug Cole of the Higher Education Academy argues the risks of this approach becoming the prevailing narrative as policy is formulated.

Why TEF must measure employability not employment

Marking the report of his HEPI pamphlet ‘Employability: Degrees of Value’, Johnny Rich argues that the government is wrong to focus on measures of employment in the TEF and instead should be looking for student employability in the great scramble to measure teaching excellence.

The changing student experience

When the present English tuition fee regime was being planned, there were plenty of voices from inside universities warning that it would change the nature of the relationship between students and their universities for the worse. Students would, it was feared, become customers rather than partners in an academic enterprise – has this happened? Claire Callender and Paul Temple discuss their new research on the changing student experience.