25 results
Date Name

Making staff selection work in REF 2021

Institutional ‘significance tests’ for REF staff selection may be the solution the thorny issues presented by the Stern Review. Tom Frostick explains how it could work.

Industrial strategy: a small step, or giant leap?

Universities have a vital role in fixing the UK’s recent failures in improving business research and development. Richard Jones analyses the wider context behind the recent Industrial Strategy Green Paper.

Revolution stalled? Open Access, Scholarship and the State

Hopes for a new era of Open Access have somewhat stalled, and the topic continues to spark tense debates amongst scholars. Richard Fisher goes through recent developments, including Brexit, and Jisc’s recent OA deal with Elsevier.

Well informed? Research, teaching and TEF

Research-informed teaching is just one piece of a difficult jigsaw for the those designing future iterations of the TEF. Ant Bagshaw looks at some of the most recent commentary on the topic.

The Brexistential threats universities now face

We need to get thinking now about the medium-to-long term effects of Brexit, and take action to pre-empt their effects. Ant Bagshaw runs down the bigger effects of our looming divorce from the EU.

Growing concerns over blueprint for UKRI and research

There are growing grumbles about UKRI and the Higher Education and Research Bill’s proposals for the research landscape. James Wilsdon unpicks the concerns and grumbles and sets out how they might influence the debate as Parliament gears up for the debate.

Time for a Stern, hard look at the REF

As Lord Stern is tasked with reviewing the REF, James Wilsdon sets the context for the review – where it came from, what it needs to look at, and why the review brings an opportunity to reframe the research debate.

Nurse’s watery prescription for research

Following the Nurse Review of research councils, James Wilsdon reviews the long-awaited report and takes the temperature of the policy community finding that the Nobel Laureate has published something watery and unlikely to have a lasting impact on policy.

BIS, metrics and non-selective QR allocation

Following a government tender that appears to look at research metrics, Martin Eve asks what the government is up to and whether this latest move could herald a metrics-based policy shift.

The Green Paper: Nurse will see you now

James Wilsdon looks at the relationship between the Green Paper and the highly complex and political landscape of research funding and politics.

TEF, REF and lessons from history

Looking back to the origins of the REF, Tom Bailey ponders the coming TEF and asks whether what may start out as a light-touch regime could one day follow the history of the REF and the gain complexity and burden for which its cousin in measuring research excellence is often criticised for.

Dimensions of quality research

Does high performance on an academic scale co-occur with high performance in terms of societal impact? Steven Hill looks at dimensions of measuring quality in research.

REF results marred by fears over grade inflation

As the 2014 REF is published, widespread concerns are expressed in the sector that a level of grade inflation has artificially skewed the overall results. This has led to fears, from lots of different corners of the sector, over the for the future of the exercise itself and the funding that underpins it. John O’Leary brings together the sector and funder reactions to the 2014 REF results.

Enjoy your REF, while you can

This week the results of the latest cycle of research audit in UK universities will be published. This will trigger a frenzy of analysis as the bones of REF 2014 are picked over with a view to identifying winners and losers, risers and fallers, and what if anything it might mean for the future. Martin McQuillan looks at how research funding has been treated by this Government and what future for the process is there in a time of increasing austerity.

Business as usual – a look at the Innovation & Research Strategy

Last week I predicted that today’s Innovation & Research Strategy would in no way be a radical document that questioned the underlying principles of research or research funding. Despite some optimistic thinking in some quarters of the sector, today we can see that the Government’s appetite for constant revolution is starting to wane. This strategy has instead provided them with an opportunity to reinforce what’s already working and look ahead – albeit only to the short or medium term.

Time for research (Updated)

Next week, we are expecting the government to launch their long-awaited Innovation & Research strategy. Still suffering whiplash from the HE White Paper, there are those in the sector feeling nervous about what might be coming. But do they need to be?

The research funding debate: why size doesn’t matter

Research was notable by its absence in the HE white paper, leaving a large hole in the government’s plans for the sector. Recognition of its importance to higher education and its inter-relationship with issues related to the teaching of undergraduates, which features so prominently in the document, should have been included. Research has no need of revolution but as a central tenet of UK higher education, it seems incongruous not to build other policies on the foundation that it provides.