40 results
Date Name

A bushel and a peck – OfS subscription fees again

Shortly after our previous article on OfS subscriptions was published, DfE updated their impact assessments. Once again, Catherine Boyd and David Kernohan are here to take you through the implications.

How much will OfS cost institutions?

How much will institutional subscriptions raise to fund the new Office for Students? Not enough, argue Wonkhe’s David Kernohan and Catherine Boyd.

How to read: Michael Barber’s UUK speech

Sir Michael Barber

How do we interpret Sir Michael Barber’s first major speech in his new role as Chair of the Office for Students? David Kernohan has been quietly following Barber’s career, and he has a few thoughts.

Ministers must stop spreading bogus news about bogus colleges

The government regularly claims that it has cracked down on hundreds of ‘bogus colleges’ offering student visas, but is that really the case? Mike Ratcliffe has looked into who really has been coming on and off the Tier 4 register.

Deliverology in, out and around the university

As Michael Barber starts his tenure as Chair of the Office of Students, David Morris reviews his recent writing on universities, policymaking and government, to unpick what his approach might be.

Creating a level playing field not as easy as it looks

The Higher Education and Research Bill has been heralded by Jo Johnson as a game changer for the fortunes of alternative providers, but there are still many barriers to sector entry, as Catherine Boyd has found out.

Will the next quality system be genuinely risk-based?

As a new system of quality assessment is about to be introduced, Colin Raban and David Cairns ask if it is likely to be genuinely risk-based, and what can be learnt from the regulation of other sectors in designing a new framework for HE.

New providers, new analogy

With the Green Paper indicating that the Government is seeking to further break down barriers to entry for private providers, Mike Ratcliffe tries to compare apples and oranges. Or Byron and McDonalds. Or chalk and cheese. Pick your own analogy, wonks.

Green Paper: six questions about regulation

HE regulation specialist Andrew Boggs asks six outstanding questions about the Green Paper’s proposals – particularly those linked to regulation and the future shape of the higher education market.

The accelerated level playing field

Andrew McGettigan casts a forensic eye over the Green Paper’s proposals on market entry and exit, degree awarding powers, alternative providers and the government’s desire to create a ‘level playing field’.

The TEF’s first assessment

David Kernohan unpacks the TEF – all the detail from the Green Paper’s announcement – what will work, what probably wont and how the new model will shape up.

Removing the fuzzy edges from the TEF

The Chancellor has this week indicated that the coming TEF will be tied to an increase in fees – which has refocussed attention on the nascent policy and upped its stakes. Gordon McKenzie says its now time for the TEF to have some harder edges.