26 results
Date Name

Creating a level playing field not as easy as it looks

The Higher Education and Research Bill has been heralded by Jo Johnson as a game changer for the fortunes of alternative providers, but there are still many barriers to sector entry, as Catherine Boyd has found out.

Will the next quality system be genuinely risk-based?

As a new system of quality assessment is about to be introduced, Colin Raban and David Cairns ask if it is likely to be genuinely risk-based, and what can be learnt from the regulation of other sectors in designing a new framework for HE.

New providers, new analogy

With the Green Paper indicating that the Government is seeking to further break down barriers to entry for private providers, Mike Ratcliffe tries to compare apples and oranges. Or Byron and McDonalds. Or chalk and cheese. Pick your own analogy, wonks.

Green Paper: six questions about regulation

HE regulation specialist Andrew Boggs asks six outstanding questions about the Green Paper’s proposals – particularly those linked to regulation and the future shape of the higher education market.

The accelerated level playing field

Andrew McGettigan casts a forensic eye over the Green Paper’s proposals on market entry and exit, degree awarding powers, alternative providers and the government’s desire to create a ‘level playing field’.

The TEF’s first assessment

David Kernohan unpacks the TEF – all the detail from the Green Paper’s announcement – what will work, what probably wont and how the new model will shape up.

Removing the fuzzy edges from the TEF

The Chancellor has this week indicated that the coming TEF will be tied to an increase in fees – which has refocussed attention on the nascent policy and upped its stakes. Gordon McKenzie says its now time for the TEF to have some harder edges.

Back to school with Jo Johnson

Jo Johnson has delivered his much-anticipated speech about higher education ‘Teaching at the heart of the system’. Mark Leach gives his early analysis of the speech and what it all might mean for the coming period of policy.

HEFCE press the quality reset button

Derfel Owen assesses HEFCE’s proposals for reforming the quality assessment system and gives us early conclusions and implications of five of the key proposals set out by the funding council today.

Public trust and the higher education ombudsman

Ten years after its founding, OIA’s chief executive Rob Behrens reflects on the role of the independent adjudicator in higher education – and all the sector has learned about complaints and public trust in universities.

New federalism and UK higher education

Continuing his series on regulation and higher education, Andrew Boggs looks at the implications for UK HE from the renewed focussed on creating a federal UK following the Scottish Independence Referendum. Devolution poses many challenges for policymakers, and for higher education the implications are enormous. But with great challenges, comes interesting opportunities for the sector to draw on international experiences and recast relationships with the nations that they are a part of, as well as with the United Kingdom.

Uncertainty versus risk in HE regulation

Continuing his series on HE regulation, Andrew Boggs of the former Higher Education Better Regulation Group examines a new approach which new higher education regulation should employ. Particularly, Andrew will consider uncertainty-based, rather than risk-based, approaches to regulation – a meaningful difference that will require greater trust between regulators and providers and investment in human intelligence at the expense of data dependence.

Creating a regulatory system in English HE

The recent movement of teaching funding from public grants to student fees has triggered a wider discussion about reform of the higher education regulatory system in England. In this piece, Andrew Boggs of the Higher Education Better Regulation Group looks at the challenges posed by designing a single regulatory regime and what may need to be considered by policymakers in the next Parliament as they look towards ironing out regulation of English HE.

Life of PI: performance indicators in higher education

Performance indicators might sound dull, but how the sector chooses to evaluate themselves in the future will have a huge impact on league tables, reputation and institutional success. Post-financial crisis and with a political desire to create a ‘level playing field’, shaping the future of performance indicators takes on a new urgency and raises a host of complications that the sector needs to get to grips with. Adam Child takes a look for us.

The Pearson BSc

The media today has been covering the public launch of Pearson College. The new offering from the education publishing giant sees it move into full undergraduate degrees from the HNCs and HNDs it offers through its subsidiary, the examination board Edexcel. This post looks at the interesting changes to Pearson’s business model that have taken place which tells us a lot about the current state of HE reform.

Public Accounts Committee calls for more regulation

Today the Public Accounts Committee has released their report ‘Regulating Financial Sustainability in Higher Education’. It calls for greater regulation of HE after the new funding regime begins and raps BIS on the knuckles for getting their sums wrong over fees. It could make for uncomfortable, but probably not devastating reading in some parts of Government. And it adds weight to those who’ve been arguing for a long time that the Coalition’s fees policy doesn’t add up. This post has a look at some of the headlines from the report.