26 results
Date Name

Another false dawn for Grade Point Averages?

The Green Paper and White Paper differ markedly on their enthusiasm for GPA. Martin Hewitt wonders if there might be alternatives to a complete overhaul of degree classification.

Peace in our time? The other future of quality assessment

HEFCE unexpectedly announced the outcome of their quality tender on Friday, giving the lion’s share of the work to QAA. And with a White Paper out today that has a thing or two to say about quality, we ask: are the quality wars over?

Will the next quality system be genuinely risk-based?

As a new system of quality assessment is about to be introduced, Colin Raban and David Cairns ask if it is likely to be genuinely risk-based, and what can be learnt from the regulation of other sectors in designing a new framework for HE.

CETLs and the ghosts of teaching excellence past

Taking the long view of government-led teaching excellence initiatives, David Kernohan returns to the Centres for Excellence in Learning and Teaching (CETLs), and draws lessons for the sector and the government today.

The TEF’s first assessment

David Kernohan unpacks the TEF – all the detail from the Green Paper’s announcement – what will work, what probably wont and how the new model will shape up.

Metrics and quality: do the numbers add up?

Learning from the Australian quality experience, QAA’s Ian Kimber argues for the need for a contextualised and nuanced approach to the use of metrics, both in terms of identifying potential quality risk and of assessing student outcomes and their link to teaching quality.

Parliamentary scrutiny

As the new Business, Innovation and Skills Committee launches an inquiry in Parliament in to the quality assessment system, Hugh Jones takes a look at who the new members of the committee are, and what they’re looking to understand with the newly launched inquiry.

Dimensions of quality research

Does high performance on an academic scale co-occur with high performance in terms of societal impact? Steven Hill looks at dimensions of measuring quality in research.

Removing the fuzzy edges from the TEF

The Chancellor has this week indicated that the coming TEF will be tied to an increase in fees – which has refocussed attention on the nascent policy and upped its stakes. Gordon McKenzie says its now time for the TEF to have some harder edges.

Back to school with Jo Johnson

Jo Johnson has delivered his much-anticipated speech about higher education ‘Teaching at the heart of the system’. Mark Leach gives his early analysis of the speech and what it all might mean for the coming period of policy.

HEFCE press the quality reset button

Derfel Owen assesses HEFCE’s proposals for reforming the quality assessment system and gives us early conclusions and implications of five of the key proposals set out by the funding council today.

A critical moment for the quality debate

With debates about the future of quality in UK higher education hotting up behind the scenes, Mark Leach looks at the forthcoming HEFCE consultation and the potential huge implications that it has for the sector and how it is regulated, as well as for the future quality assurance itself.

Quality enhancement at a crossroads

The Higher Education Academy’s Annual Conference this week signals its tenth year as the UK’s quality enhancement agency for teaching and learning. The focus of the conference is ‘Preparing for learning futures’ over the next decade. Given significant cuts to the Academy’s budget over the next two years, the conference focus will likely be as much about the HEA’s future as about the learning futures in the title. In this piece, Robin Middlehurst looks at the important challenges now faced by the Academy, sector and Government and presents the key choices that now need to made.

We need to talk about credit

In 2007, The Burgess Review declared the current honours system ‘not fit for purpose’. Designed long ago when a tiny number of institutions were awarding a tiny number of degrees, its use in 2011 looks at best to be a very odd anachronism and at worst; a dangerously out of date and inappropriate way of measuring and awarding student achievement. The summative nature of the honours system is seen as the main offender and no longer appropriate for a modern higher education sector. Despite years of work on this, Professor Burgess was always going to have an uphill struggle convincing people to abandon the system that although flawed, remains familiar to institutions.

Keeping High Standards in Higher Education

In a knowledge management context, higher education and standardisation have a number of similarities. Both a university and a national standards body (NSB) should be seen as vital resources to the national economy; houses of creation for the country’s social knowledge. Economically, their activities bring £59bn (UUK, 2010) and £2.5bn (Swann, 2010) to the UK… read more