40 results
Date Name

TEF results – Who moved up and who fell down?

Thirty six higher education institutions had their final TEF results changed from the ‘initial hypothesis’ suggested by the metrics. David Kernohan has picked apart who moved up and who moved down.

TEF results – the sector spin machine gets whiring

UK universities have become world experts in spinning a good story on a ranking, and TEF is no different. Nona Buckley-Irvine has been digging through the Wonkhe inbox for the sector’s first reaction.

TEF will check the most complacent and privileged

Some parts of the sector are already trying to explain away their expected TEF results. Jim Dickinson argues that TEF should instead force some areas of the sector to face up to its shortcomings.

People in higher education: Amatey Doku

Nona Buckley-Irvine meets the new NUS Vice President for Higher Education to talk about TEF, the black attainment gap, working with the sector, and Cambridge.

It’s time to open up academic conferences to the wider world

Academia must recognise that it’s only one part of the wider scholarly ecosystem, and academic conferences must reach outside to the wider world. Matthew Flinders explains how this has influenced the Political Studies Association.

Here to stay: the politics behind TEF wonkery

The scuffles over TEF’s methodological merits have a fundamentally political angle. David Morris picks through the recent debates concerning NSS, benchmarking, and medals.

An article of blame or an article of faith?

Responding to Sonia Sodha’s article in The Observer which strongly criticised universities, Andy Westwood asks if the sector has got the balance right in the debate about value and diversity in the system.

The case for a Scottish (Blue) Bell

The Bell Review was disappointingly light on consideration of the devolved nations. Alastair Robertson argues that it is time for a similar rationalisation of Scotland’s distinctive sector agencies.

Precarious work is no longer atypical in academia

Jonathan White gets behind the numbers on casual and precarious employment in universities, and explains why trade unions and employers are struggling to see eye-to-eye on the issue.