16 results
Date Name

No one left behind: slowing down and speeding up HE

The social mobility debate must move on from getting a small number of students into ‘selective’ institutions and think more about opening up higher learning through more flexible funding and credit accumulation. Daisy Hooper makes the case.

Going part time

On the publication of the Conservative think tank Bright Blue’s report on part time higher education, Open University vice chancellor Peter Horrocks looks at the proposals in their political context.

Understanding and reversing the decline in PT students

On the publication of a new report from Bright Blue on reversing the decline of part time students, the report’s authors James Dobson and Ryan Shorthouse set out the case for a new graduate levy on employers.

HE participation increases by 4%

Official statistics released today show an increased rate of participation in higher education. The provisional Higher Education Initial Participation Rate (HEIPR) estimate was 47%, up from 43% in 2012/13.

Part-time student numbers plummet

As HESA release its data from the 2013/14 academic year, part time students have been shown to drop significantly and the proportion of graduates receiving first and second class degrees have increased substantially. Emily Lupton rounds up the latest data.

Policy failures in higher education: reflecting on ELQs

In the first of a new series looking at policy failure in and around higher education, David Malcolm reflects on the legacy of the controversial government decision to cease funding for Equivalent and Lower Qualifications (ELQs). How and why it came about, what effect it had on students and the sector, the debates it sparked in policymaking, as well as a look at what the future might hold for this unpopular policy.

Winners and losers in the current system

There is no doubt that, as with most changes, the £9,000 fee system introduced in England in 2012-13 created winners and losers. We know that applications are back up for full-time undergraduates – and we know this includes students from non-traditional backgrounds, which is great. But that is not the whole story. On the day the Public Accounts Committee confirm the rising costs of writing off loans, Libby Hackett looks at the winners and losers in the current system, and calls for a fundamental rethink.