24 results
Date Name

A positive outcome? Steps towards a new DLHE

There was consensus and conflict within the sector over how to best measure graduate outcomes. Rachel Hewitt takes us through the highlights of the new DLHE consultation responses.

Austerity, the Spending Review and a crisis in human capital

We thought the last Spending Review in 2010 was bad enough. But this one – covering 2015-16 and then 2016-2018 is beginning to look a whole lot worse. Alongside this is a growing attack on the knowledge economy and the idea of human capital in the media and by policy makers. What might this mean for the future of further and higher education in the UK? Andy Westwood gives his take.

Capturing the future of graduate outcomes

HESA has made significant strides forward in designing a new graduate destinations survey to replace DLHE. Dan Cook gives us an update on the decisions made so far.

Differential fees need scrutiny, not sympathy

Tom Bailey offers a response to Dean Machin’s case for differential fees by subject and institution, arguing that it would be unfair, impractical and imprudent.

Digesting the Longitudinal Educational Outcome data

On the day the government releases LEO data showing graduate earnings over time, we take a first look at the data, what it shows and what’s in store as the agenda develops.

Employability: Congratulations to the best and ‘worst’ performers…

HESA have recently released the latest DLHE figures showing the destinations of graduates six months after obtaining their degrees. They have sparked headlines about unemployed graduates as well as underemployed graduates – those that can’t find work and those having to take non graduate jobs. Stories on the BBC and in broadsheets from the Guardian to the Telegraph have highlighted up to 1 in 5 graduates unemployed at six months and around 1 in 4 of those in work in jobs that might not require degree level qualifications. These findings come at a time when fees are rising to £9k a year and many commentators can’t resist seeing the data as proof that too many people go to university and that there aren’t the jobs to accommodate them all. Andy Westwood takes a closer look at the data and argues that this is a lazy and potentially damaging view.

Has DLHE had its day?

Following the passing of the Small Business, Enterprise and Employment Act which allows for educational data to be linked to tax records, Charlie Ball asks if this will ultimately see the demise of the controversial Destination of Leavers in Higher Education (DLHE) survey?

Human capital: interview with author of IFS graduate earnings study

On Wednesday the Institute for Fiscal Studies published the first report into graduate earnings – Andrew McGettigan discussed the report’s findings and their implications with one of the report’s authors: Jack Britton, Senior Research Economist at IFS.

Human capital: let’s talk about graduate outcomes

Following the recent IFS report into graduate earnings, Charlie Ball discusses the significant implications for the sector, and previews the forthcoming consultation on the future of the DLHE survey – an opportunity to get this right for the future.

NewDLHE model close to full assembly

HESA has assembled its proposed model for a new DLHE. Catherine Boyd picks out the headline changes, including open centralisation, linking to LEO data, and a new survey date.

Prior attainment, gender gaps and other lessons from LEO

After the release of the government’s new LEO data, we draw some early lessons about what it shows about graduate earnings, the labour market and universities’ ability to influence the employment prospects of their graduates.

Reforming employability measures

It is widely understood that graduates with higher level skills are critical to the ability of the UK economy to innovate and thus be competitive internationally so it is vitally important that the way we measure how the supply of graduates meets the demand of employers is useful to both universities and businesses. Rosa Fernandez looks at recent research that shows why current measures of graduate employability are not sufficient, and shows how it could improve.

The student as labourer-consumer

One of the odder beliefs that our culture seems to have developed about markets is the idea of market efficiency. Specifically, the idea that – given the publicly available information presented at the time of action – the actions of any given player in a market are unable to offer greater efficiency than the average of the actions of all players within that market. Or, to stick this in non-economist language, if everyone has access to the same info then no-one has an advantage.

What if there isn’t a skills deficit?

David Morris argues that not far in the future, the sector may not be able to rely on old assumptions about their role in driving skills and so need to start thinking now about how universities should to adapt to shifting economic trends.

Winners and losers in the current system

There is no doubt that, as with most changes, the £9,000 fee system introduced in England in 2012-13 created winners and losers. We know that applications are back up for full-time undergraduates – and we know this includes students from non-traditional backgrounds, which is great. But that is not the whole story. On the day the Public Accounts Committee confirm the rising costs of writing off loans, Libby Hackett looks at the winners and losers in the current system, and calls for a fundamental rethink.