10 results
Date Name

NewDLHE model close to full assembly

HESA has assembled its proposed model for a new DLHE. Catherine Boyd picks out the headline changes, including open centralisation, linking to LEO data, and a new survey date.

Prior attainment, gender gaps and other lessons from LEO

After the release of the government’s new LEO data, we draw some early lessons about what it shows about graduate earnings, the labour market and universities’ ability to influence the employment prospects of their graduates.

Digesting the Longitudinal Educational Outcome data

On the day the government releases LEO data showing graduate earnings over time, we take a first look at the data, what it shows and what’s in store as the agenda develops.

What if there isn’t a skills deficit?

David Morris argues that not far in the future, the sector may not be able to rely on old assumptions about their role in driving skills and so need to start thinking now about how universities should to adapt to shifting economic trends.

Human capital: let’s talk about graduate outcomes

Following the recent IFS report into graduate earnings, Charlie Ball discusses the significant implications for the sector, and previews the forthcoming consultation on the future of the DLHE survey – an opportunity to get this right for the future.

Has DLHE had its day?

Following the passing of the Small Business, Enterprise and Employment Act which allows for educational data to be linked to tax records, Charlie Ball asks if this will ultimately see the demise of the controversial Destination of Leavers in Higher Education (DLHE) survey?

Employability: Congratulations to the best and ‘worst’ performers…

HESA have recently released the latest DLHE figures showing the destinations of graduates six months after obtaining their degrees. They have sparked headlines about unemployed graduates as well as underemployed graduates – those that can’t find work and those having to take non graduate jobs. Stories on the BBC and in broadsheets from the Guardian to the Telegraph have highlighted up to 1 in 5 graduates unemployed at six months and around 1 in 4 of those in work in jobs that might not require degree level qualifications. These findings come at a time when fees are rising to £9k a year and many commentators can’t resist seeing the data as proof that too many people go to university and that there aren’t the jobs to accommodate them all. Andy Westwood takes a closer look at the data and argues that this is a lazy and potentially damaging view.