133 results
Date Name

Dangerous acts and dogs’ breakfasts

The Higher Education and Research Act – was it really all that? David Kernohan argues that the claims of generational significance are dogging attempts at radical reform.

Is Britain’s university system really a timebomb?

Mike Ratcliffe defuses that UK2020 report, and offers a critique of the way it has been constructed. He argues that we need to address these arguments, despite their low quality, as they are continuing to catch the attention of the media.

A real step change for fair access

As the work of the Office for Fair Access begins to transfer to the new Office for Students, Les Ebdon offers his perspective on the way the new body will need to approach this vitally important issue.

Making a co-operative university

Members of the Social Science Centre, Lincoln introduce us to the emerging world of co-operative higher education, including plans to develop a UK co-operative university.

Be it enacted: The Higher Education and Research Act

The Higher Education and Research Bill has now been approved by both the Commons and Lords, and the Queen. Finally, we have a Higher Education and Research Act. We round up the major provisions and the best of Wonkhe’s coverage.

Deliverology in, out and around the university

As Michael Barber starts his tenure as Chair of the Office of Students, David Morris reviews his recent writing on universities, policymaking and government, to unpick what his approach might be.

Give him credit? Course switching gets a nudge

As Jo Johnson launches a renewed push to ‘encourage’ universities to start a proper system of credit transfer, Ant Bagshaw reviews the history of this old idea and the current proposals on the table.

Johnson revs up plans for fast-track degrees

Accelerated degrees are not a new idea, but Jo Johnson has put them firmly back on the agenda in the last week, launching a renewed funding drive and tweaks to the funding system to enable them. If universities are interested in offering this form of provision.

The ancient argument, royal charters and universities

If an institution is not functioning properly or meeting regulatory requirements, why should an ancient charter exempt them from possible closure or intervention? Catherine Boyd looks a the furore over Royal Charters.

Prudence and privilege in the HE Bill debate

The current battles in the Lords may secure some constructive amendments to the HE Bill, but it would be politically unwise for the upper house to completely scupper the legislation.