210 results
Date Name

When you can’t do right for doing wrong

Reports of universities jumping the gun on inflationary fee increases are greatly exaggerated, and have forgotten to account for consumer protection law.

The Brexistential threats universities now face

We need to get thinking now about the medium-to-long term effects of Brexit, and take action to pre-empt their effects. Ant Bagshaw runs down the bigger effects of our looming divorce from the EU.

Scottish and English records on access should be compared

The access record of universities in Scotland has been disappointing, and the Scottish Government needs to stop sidelining the problem. Lucy Hunter Blackburn argues that despite that the comparison with England holds up, despite what the politicians are saying.

TEF and tuition fees – myths and reality

The debate over tuition fees is slowly warming up again, but what’s really going on? David Morris has crunched the numbers about the TEF’s potential to allow universities to raise fees.

The left is lost on higher education

Emran Mian argues that the left is offering no constructive alternative to the government’s market-led agenda in HE, and thus have very little of use to add to the debate.

Differential fees need scrutiny, not sympathy

Tom Bailey offers a response to Dean Machin’s case for differential fees by subject and institution, arguing that it would be unfair, impractical and imprudent.

Human capital: interview with author of IFS graduate earnings study

On Wednesday the Institute for Fiscal Studies published the first report into graduate earnings – Andrew McGettigan discussed the report’s findings and their implications with one of the report’s authors: Jack Britton, Senior Research Economist at IFS.

Short-termism is putting Northern Irish universities at risk

In Northern Ireland, public funding cuts to the higher education sector are jeopardising the economic future of a region that has been blighted by relatively high levels of unemployment and deprivation coupled with low levels of productivity and economic activity.

Budget 2016: High politics may trump real policy

George Osborne will publish his seventh budget less than four weeks away on 16th March 2016 and with a looming referendum and high politics dominating the agenda, it’s likely to be his most short and technical to date.

What do we mean when we talk about ‘selective’ universities?

What does it mean to be a selective university in today’s UK HE market? Vice chancellor of Nottingham Trent University Edward Peck uses his own institution as an example in comparing the nature of selectivity across HE.

Beyond conspiracy: Why TEF plus fees may drive efficiency

The debate about the TEF’s impending link to fees has caused widespread debate in the sector, but what if this measure was interpreted differently – as a measure of inflation ? Gordon McKenzie wonders about the funding choices universities will have to take if the Green Paper proposals are implemented.

Spending Review: the great NHS bursary gamble

David Malcolm unpicks the Government’s announcement that support for nurses are being converted in to loans and previews the debates that are likely to follow over what could prove to be a controversial measure.