10 results
Date Name

Wonkhe consultation on support for postgraduate study

As the government announce their consultation on postgraduate support, we announce a parallel process aimed at ensuring the next government takes the sector’s view seriously, and so that PG support doesn’t get lost in the political storms ahead.

Budget 2015: loans for PhD and masters students

Today’s 2015 budget announces loans of £25,000 for masters and PhD students as part of a package from the government to “broaden and strengthen support for postgraduate researchers”. We round up the highlights for HE and science from the government’s last Budget before the coming General Election.

Autumn Statement: Pain, sorcery and a rabbit called Tim

On the day the Chancellor has made his Autumn Statement for 2014, Andy Westwood reviews the statement and its implications for policy across higher education, science and beyond – both today and over the next Parliament which is set to see further deep cuts and real pain across Government spending.

Postgraduate loans – everything we know

In this afternoon’s Autumn Statement, the Chancellor announced that the Government would introduce loans for all young people that want to access postgraduate study, of up to £10,000 across all disciplines. There have been growing calls over the last few years for the introduction of such a scheme from think tanks and sector organisations including IPPR, NUS, CentreForum and others.

The case for a postgraduate loans system

The principle of fair access is central to debates about higher education: almost everybody agrees that no one should be denied the opportunity to go to university because they cannot afford to pay. This is why we have a subsidised loans system. However, this principle has not been applied to postgraduate study, where there is no subsidised loan system at all. Rick Muir writes about his latest report for IPPR which shows why we need such a system for postgraduates and how it would be affordable for government to implement.

Winners and losers in the current system

There is no doubt that, as with most changes, the £9,000 fee system introduced in England in 2012-13 created winners and losers. We know that applications are back up for full-time undergraduates – and we know this includes students from non-traditional backgrounds, which is great. But that is not the whole story. On the day the Public Accounts Committee confirm the rising costs of writing off loans, Libby Hackett looks at the winners and losers in the current system, and calls for a fundamental rethink.