41 results
Date Name

There’s a difference between ‘good’ and ‘good value’

Universities will struggle to improve their public image without understanding their critics’ point over whether they offer good value to students and the taxpayer. David Morris tries to illustrate this point with a drawn-out metaphor.

Is the tuition fee system now under threat?

There are noises from deep within all major political parties now expressing concern about tuition fees. Are the political winds starting to blow against the current system?

The graduate tax: higher education’s zombie idea

Owen Smith’s revival of the graduate tax idea is the latest attempt to find an ugly compromise between tuition fees and free education. Politicians need to chose one or the other, argues Will Cooling.

Labour rules out new HE funding policy

At Labour Party Conference held in Brighton, we report from an HE meeting were Gordon Marsden – the new shadow universities minister – strongly ruled out an early new commitment around HE fees and funding.

The future of universities is more political than ever

Following the July Budget, big speech from the new universities minister and developments at the Home Office, Martin McQuillan brings together everything we know and considers how the Conservatives will tackle higher education over the next parliament.

£11.5k fees? Time to come back down to earth

As fees take the stage one final time as the General Election campaign draws to a close, Mark Leach argues that it is time to bring the whole issue back to reality and proposes a bold move to ensure that HE fees and finance take their rightful place at the heart of our political and economic debate.

The 2015 UKIP Manifesto

Emily Lupton summarises UKIP’s 2015 election manifesto and what the party plans for higher education including free tuition for STEMM courses and abolishing loans for EU students.

Winners and losers from £6,000 fees

A fortnight ago, the higher education choice at the forthcoming general election became clearer as a result of Labour’s policy announcement. Graeme Wise returns to the issue to assess the winners and losers from the £6,000 fees policy.

£6,000 fees: unanswered questions

As the dust settles on the Labour announcement that they would lower fees to £6,000 next year, Julian Gravatt looks in detail at the policy and asks ten questions on funding, regulation and policy that are raised by the promise of lower fees.

Blue skies thinking

After the heat and noise around Labour’s announced £6,000 fee policy, Martin McQuillan continues his monthly series on higher education politics and policy by turning his attention to the Conservative Party – their policies and what life might be like for universities if the Conservatives are returned to power in May.

The £6,000 question

As the shockwaves reverberate, Mark Leach takes a look at the reaction in the press, sector, political parties and in early public opinion to Labour’s plan to lower fees to £6,000.

Labour announce £6k fees for 2016

Labour have announced their long-anticipated policy to reduce fees from £9,000 to £6,000. Ed Miliband also announced that Labour would raise maintenance grants by £400. Emily Lupton goes through everything we know about the ‘fully funded’ plan. This piece will be updated as information becomes available.

A small sigh of relief?

Following Labour’s announcement that they would lower fees from 9k to 6k, Alistiar Jarvis looks at why the policy isn’t nearly as bad as some in the sector had feared – but warns of challenges on the road ahead.

Live: Labour’s higher education policy announcement

Live updates, analysis, commentary, reaction and general wonkery from Mark Leach on the day that Labour sets out its plans for higher education funding that the party will take to the country at May’s General Election.

Labour’s HE funding plan – why raiding my tax break is a good idea

In the run up to Labour’s expected announcement that they will cut fees from £9,000 to £6,000, Graeme Wise looks at the method proposed to pay for it – the controversial cut in pensioner tax relief – and finds a progressive solution that has the added benefit of rolling back the marketisation of the sector and reducing some of the risks associated with the student loans system.

Politics isn’t fair, is it?

As the sector goes to war with politicians over higher education fees, Jim Dickinson calls for an alternative approach: one supported by the public and based on a respect for democracy and the politics (and politicians) that drive it.

Labour higher education funding policy 101

On the day Universities UK launches a major political intervention in to the HE funding debate, Mark Leach takes a look at the current state of Labour Party fees policy. How we got here and what the options are for a way out that satisfies the increasingly difficult political and economic climate.