27 results
Date Name

The real value of abolishing tuition fees in England

There are lots of good reasons for the higher education sector to support a proposal to abolish tuition fees. Christopher Newfield makes the case for reframing the debate about university funding in the UK and the US.

£11.5k fees? Time to come back down to earth

As fees take the stage one final time as the General Election campaign draws to a close, Mark Leach argues that it is time to bring the whole issue back to reality and proposes a bold move to ensure that HE fees and finance take their rightful place at the heart of our political and economic debate.

The 2015 SNP Manifesto

In their 2015 General Election manifesto published today, the SNP confirms that they will support the lowering of fees across the UK.

The 2015 UKIP Manifesto

Emily Lupton summarises UKIP’s 2015 election manifesto and what the party plans for higher education including free tuition for STEMM courses and abolishing loans for EU students.

Budget 2015: loans for PhD and masters students

Today’s 2015 budget announces loans of £25,000 for masters and PhD students as part of a package from the government to “broaden and strengthen support for postgraduate researchers”. We round up the highlights for HE and science from the government’s last Budget before the coming General Election.

Winners and losers from £6,000 fees

A fortnight ago, the higher education choice at the forthcoming general election became clearer as a result of Labour’s policy announcement. Graeme Wise returns to the issue to assess the winners and losers from the £6,000 fees policy.

£6,000 fees: unanswered questions

As the dust settles on the Labour announcement that they would lower fees to £6,000 next year, Julian Gravatt looks in detail at the policy and asks ten questions on funding, regulation and policy that are raised by the promise of lower fees.

Blue skies thinking

After the heat and noise around Labour’s announced £6,000 fee policy, Martin McQuillan continues his monthly series on higher education politics and policy by turning his attention to the Conservative Party – their policies and what life might be like for universities if the Conservatives are returned to power in May.

The £6,000 question

As the shockwaves reverberate, Mark Leach takes a look at the reaction in the press, sector, political parties and in early public opinion to Labour’s plan to lower fees to £6,000.

Labour announce £6k fees for 2016

Labour have announced their long-anticipated policy to reduce fees from £9,000 to £6,000. Ed Miliband also announced that Labour would raise maintenance grants by £400. Emily Lupton goes through everything we know about the ‘fully funded’ plan. This piece will be updated as information becomes available.

A small sigh of relief?

Following Labour’s announcement that they would lower fees from 9k to 6k, Alistiar Jarvis looks at why the policy isn’t nearly as bad as some in the sector had feared – but warns of challenges on the road ahead.

Live: Labour’s higher education policy announcement

Live updates, analysis, commentary, reaction and general wonkery from Mark Leach on the day that Labour sets out its plans for higher education funding that the party will take to the country at May’s General Election.

Labour’s HE funding plan – why raiding my tax break is a good idea

In the run up to Labour’s expected announcement that they will cut fees from £9,000 to £6,000, Graeme Wise looks at the method proposed to pay for it – the controversial cut in pensioner tax relief – and finds a progressive solution that has the added benefit of rolling back the marketisation of the sector and reducing some of the risks associated with the student loans system.

Fees, austerity and war: understanding the student vote

In the week that the Labour Party is expected to set out its plans for higher education after the General Election, Adam Wright explores the student vote, how it maps against wider social trends and looks at how and why student support for the Green party may impact Labour in May.

The art of the implausible

A week after vice chancellors intervened in the General Election campaign with an attack on Labour’s tentative proposal to lower tuition fees – citing its ‘implausibility’ – Martin McQuillan argues that the intervention was a mistake that may now backfire.

Politics isn’t fair, is it?

As the sector goes to war with politicians over higher education fees, Jim Dickinson calls for an alternative approach: one supported by the public and based on a respect for democracy and the politics (and politicians) that drive it.

Labour higher education funding policy 101

On the day Universities UK launches a major political intervention in to the HE funding debate, Mark Leach takes a look at the current state of Labour Party fees policy. How we got here and what the options are for a way out that satisfies the increasingly difficult political and economic climate.

Grant letter: HEFCE’s regulatory powers beefed up

Today came the HEFCE grant letter from BIS which outlines funding for higher education in England for 2015-16. Overall the allocations remain much the same as indicated in last years letter, but as ever, there are some interesting bits around the margins that the wonks will want to note.

Understanding the unthinkable post-2015 cuts

The Autumn Statement confirmed the Chancellor’s plans to make further substantial cuts in the next Parliament. Around £4bn will likely have to come out of the budget for Department for Business, Innovation and Skills. Julian Gravatt thinks the unthinkable about what this means for HE, research, science and skills.

Beyond the broken funding system

As the BIS Select Committee adds its weight to the growing consensus about the (un)sustainability of the Coalition’s higher education funding policies, Sam Jones looks at the difficult political and economic climate both before and after next year’s General Election. With the policy case now hard to refute, he calls for another Browne-style review to create political consensus and lasting change.