7 results
Date Name

Short-termism is putting Northern Irish universities at risk

In Northern Ireland, public funding cuts to the higher education sector are jeopardising the economic future of a region that has been blighted by relatively high levels of unemployment and deprivation coupled with low levels of productivity and economic activity.

George’s Marvellous Medicine

Previewing this week’s Emergency Budget, Andy Westwood assesses George Osborne’s long-term economic plan, the short-term pressures on spending, and the grand Northern Powerhouse narrative that will likely shape the legacy of this uniquely powerful Chancellor.

Policy and funding across borders

Following a recent HEPI report on the issue, Peter Halligan writes on the Welsh perspective of student mobility across the UK and the right of Welsh-domiciled students to take their student fee grant when studying elsewhere in the UK.

£6,000 fees: unanswered questions

As the dust settles on the Labour announcement that they would lower fees to £6,000 next year, Julian Gravatt looks in detail at the policy and asks ten questions on funding, regulation and policy that are raised by the promise of lower fees.

HEPI report defends student mobility

A report released today by HEPI questions to whom does the higher education budget in Wales belong, particularly the Welsh portable fee grant, as well as exploring the high costs for students from Northern Ireland and Scotland who chose to study in England, and whether or not students from the UK should be able to take funding into the EU.

Student finance in the devolved administrations

The upcoming general election has offered many of us the opportunity to reflect on the student finance system. The political rhetoric is entirely focused on the headline-grabbing issue of tuition fees, rather than the more prosaic topic of student living costs. But there is much more we need to understand here. Based on a Unite/Wonkhe data hackathon, Jenny Shaw looks at the approach to student finance across the UK.