29 results
Date Name

What determines university choice, and what is its monetary value?

How do different characteristics of universities influence choice? The team at London Economics has taken a look at how rankings, employability, and student support influence the perceived net monetary value of a degree, and found some intriguing results.

Transparency revolution: is there bias in university admissions?

UCAS have released an unprecedented amount of data which gives detailed breakdowns across institutions of applications by sex, race and economic status. There were hopes that it might settle the question about bias in admissions: but does it?

The PM has moved the admissions debate forward

UCU’s Angela Nartey says that, in his intervention on universities and race, the Prime Minister is right that there is something “ingrained, institutional and insidious” about universities today

A call for transparency in university admissions

Angela Nartey, policy officer at the University and College Union, takes a look at their new report which suggests an overhaul of the university application system using actual grades rather than predicted.

Record highs for university applications

Almost 600,000 students applied to university in 2015, a 2 per cent increase on the year before. More young people from disadvantaged backgrounds are applying to higher education but there are less applications from older age groups and the gap between men and women applying to university continues to rise.

Record highs entering HE but gender gap widens

Today UCAS released their End of Cycle Report for 2014 and this year, for the first time ever, over half a million students entered higher education. More students are entering higher education from disadvantaged backgrounds and closing the class gap but simultaneously, the gap between men and women entering higher education is getting wider.

Interesting trends in latest UCAS data

UCAS have now published their data for applications to the 15 January deadline. By this stage, almost all school-leavers who are going to apply have applied, and a significant proportion of the overseas and older applicants have also applied. This provides us with a reasonably firm basis for taking stock of this years’ recruitment position.

UCAS Data: 2013 Cycle

UCAS have now published their mid-December data on the 2013 cycle, and the press coverage has been mainly downbeat, perhaps because UCAS has not tried the faintly ludicrous ‘late surge’ spin that they put on the equivalent data last year. But there are several reasons why we need to be cautious about drawing hasty conclusions from the data released so far.

Clearing 2012: How wrong was I, and why?

Back in July, I wrote a post confidently predicting that this year’s Clearing would be less interesting than was widely expected, Somebody, somewhere will have a bad experience in Clearing because somebody, somewhere always does, but there is no reason to expect a pattern or trend. Those who do badly this year may do well next time. Life staggers on much as before. In this post, I look back at Clearing and ask who won, who lost and why? And why I got it wrong in July. Sort of.

Application with results: is fairness the issue?

Last Friday, the UCAS Admissions Process Review consultation came to an end and now we must wait to see whether the proposals to shift to an ‘application with results’ (formerly known as PQA) system has legs. In short, UCAS is proposing that (young) prospective students should apply to higher education, results in hand, within a short timeframe in the early summer. Applications would be turned round and decisions made within a matter of weeks.

UCAS Figures: Don’t panic….yet! – Updated 6/1/12

Today, UCAS released its November figures which offer a snapshot at where application levels are in this current cycle. They are down from last year which has caused many to claim that higher fees are putting off potential students. Despite coming from all sections of the mainstream media, as well as social media, there is absolutely no evidence for this assertion. In fact at its worst, it amounts to either lazy reporting or sometimes even opportunistic scaremongering.

Do Vice Chancellors love Cox? The ‘celebrity academic’ – a statistical analysis

You cannot have watched television on a Sunday night in the UK over the past few weeks without witnessing the wonders of Professor Brian Cox, the be-gortexed globetrotting human lens flare that has defined popular physics in 2011. With his rock&roll background, his boyish enthusiasm and charm, and his habit of wearing t-shirts that display a startling level of nipple definition, many hearts have been set a-flutter and the phrase “stellar superfluid” has taken on a whole new layer of meaning.