17 results
Date Name

Record highs for university applications

Almost 600,000 students applied to university in 2015, a 2 per cent increase on the year before. More young people from disadvantaged backgrounds are applying to higher education but there are less applications from older age groups and the gap between men and women applying to university continues to rise.

Part-time student numbers plummet

As HESA release its data from the 2013/14 academic year, part time students have been shown to drop significantly and the proportion of graduates receiving first and second class degrees have increased substantially. Emily Lupton rounds up the latest data.

Playing at University Leadership

Filling the university leadership knowledge gap: Paul Greatrix looks at a piece from the Chronicle on a leadership development game run each year by the Academic Leadership and Innovation Institute in the US for future academic leaders.

Theresa May’s war against higher education continues

On Sunday Theresa May informed the press of her intention for the Conservative Party’s next manifesto to include a pledge to kick out foreign students as soon as they graduate and introduce a shift to a ‘zero net student migration’ level. Rather than being able to apply for other visas while still in the UK, foreign graduates would have to go home and apply to return. Universities would have to enforce this, risking fines or losing their sponsorship licence if they failed to take sufficient steps to enforce it. Tom Bailey takes a closer look at this idea and where it came from.

The international search: competing in a global marketplace

Universities are competing in a global marketplace and are keen to cast the net wide when looking to fill important senior roles. But seeking global talent comes at a price. Kerry Shepherd takes a look at the usually hidden world of international search.

HEFCE transnational education report

A report released today by HEFCE (Higher Education Funding Council for England) looks investing in transnational education and its impact on student mobility. Emily Lupton summarises the report.

GPA v Degree Class: a “Goldilocks” solution?

There has been a debate in UK Higher Education for the past few years about the merits of moving away from traditional degree classifications to a US style Grade Point Average (GPA). A recent piece in the Guardian notes the arguments for moving to GPA in the UK.

‘Digital Intelligence’ for Higher Education

A recent post discussed the possible benefits of learner analytics for delivering a more personalised education. Now we have a broader view as The Chronicle of Higher Education provides an update on Educause, the huge US Education Tech Trade Show in which it is observed that everyone is talking about digital intelligence or education analytics.

New Global Universities Ranking: Shock Results

Exciting news that US News is producing a new global universities ranking. In an extraordinary related development another league table, the “World Series Ranking”, seeks to trump this and has published a top 20 which bears a remarkable similarity to the US national top 20.

World-class universities or systems?

With governments around the world looking to rankings to measure success, and perusing prestige in its various forms, is this now becoming an unhealthy distraction from creating sustainable systems that include institutions with distinctive missions able to meet the needs of the societies and economies that they serve? Jamil Salmi, the global tertiary education expert, writes about this growing tension.

The higher education case for Europe

In the week of the European Elections and with Europe high up in the UK’s political debate, Chris Hale takes a look at the higher education policy case for EU membership. With much of EU policy and legislation going above the heads of many in the UK, there are several key themes that matter tremendously to university and require the sector’s full engagement at home and in Brussels.

Public opinion could yet be our undoing

It has been an interesting week. We have grappled with the apparent outcome of the government’s student number policy, we have struggled to understand whether disaggregating international students from net migration figures will really make a difference. As an academic exercise these are fascinating, layered as they are with perverse incentives and a range of consequences both intended and unintended. Wider public perceptions about higher education and related issues matter because politicians care about what voters think. In HE, there is a growing imbalance between the priorities of the sector and societal attitudes that must be better understood by universities and policy makers alike.

Let’s MOOC the midnight bell

Quietly, imperceptibly, educational technology has become big money. A perception, fed by rising tuition fees and concerns about student satisfaction, that HE is not fit for purpose has transformed into a business opportunity so massive that even Rupert Murdoch is getting on board. When, in February of this year, Global Industry Analysts Inc suggested that e-learning would be a $107bn global market in 2015 (a little under half of the current UK national deficit), they were examining a sector that seems far from the “cottage industry” derided by Sir John Daniel (Commonwealth of Learning) in 2010.

Immigration: politics matter more than statistics

The immigration debate is becoming increasingly technical, with universities arguing for different OECD measures and inevitably, the need for more and better data. But this isn’t a technical or even an economic debate. Like many other issues it is about politics and the concerns of voters – informed and uninformed. We find ourselves in a corner because the Conservatives (and not their coalition partners the Lib Dems) pledged to bring down immigration from the hundreds to the tens of thousands in their last election manifesto.

UKBA’s student immigration proposals have no intellectual coherence

The immigration minister Damian Green gave a speech yesterday to the think tank Reform explaining the proposals set out by the UK Border Agency in its consultation on student visas.

The legal firm Pennington’s, who are experts in immigration law, suggested this week that the consultation itself could be illegal.

The Conservatives pledged to lower net migration to the ‘tens of thousands’ in their General Election manifesto. Since taking office they have realized that through a quirk of data processing that counts student in net migration figures even though very few international students take up permanent residence in the UK, enacting this pledge would require drastic cuts to international student numbers.