Date Name

The ancient argument, royal charters and universities

If an institution is not functioning properly or meeting regulatory requirements, why should an ancient charter exempt them from possible closure or intervention? Catherine Boyd looks a the furore over Royal Charters.

Prudence and privilege in the HE Bill debate

The current battles in the Lords may secure some constructive amendments to the HE Bill, but it would be politically unwise for the upper house to completely scupper the legislation.

Stern times ahead for REF game players

As the REF2021 consultation gets into gear, Martin McQuillan argues that tnstitutions and academics who support Stern’s reforms to the REF will soon regret their masochism.

Lessons from the A47 (and the university bubble)

Spending time on the road in places that university seems remote, Jim Dickinson has been thinking about life outside the HE bubble and how following Brexit, Trump and the rest, we might reframe the way we think about our communities.

Precarious work is no longer atypical in academia

Jonathan White gets behind the numbers on casual and precarious employment in universities, and explains why trade unions and employers are struggling to see eye-to-eye on the issue.

Could TEF be good news for disabled students?

The use of split metrics in the TEF could incentivise universities to do more to support disabled students’ attainment and employment prospects, and perhaps make up some of the way for recent cuts to DSA, argues Robert McLaren.

The TEF is a statistical wonderland

Should the top prizes in TEF be benchmarked for a university’s entry tariff? Tony Strike argues they should not, and instead that Gold should mean ‘best’, and not just ‘better than expected’.

It’s time for bursaries to demonstrate their impact

Whether bursaries actually work at widening access has long been a controversial topic. Les Ebdon writes how OFFA has introduced a new tool to help universities evaluate bursaries’ impact, which will be required for future access agreements.

Busting five common myths about the TEF

Chris Husbands’ phone has been ringing off the hook with questions and concerns about the TEF. As Chair of the new exercise, he tries to put to bed some of the more common misunderstandings about the TEF.

A working class hero is something to be

Students at Oxford’s StHilda’s College have voted to appoint a Class Liberation Officer – something easy to make fun of. But Claire Lynch argues why this shows they are needed more than ever.

Turning students into citizens: a charter for active citizenship

A new GuildHE report shows that social action and active citizenship are an important aspect of higher education. Joy Carter argues that universities must actively demonstrate their social value and the power of community action by staff and students.

The case for social mobility league tables

Following last week’s annual report from the Social Mobility Commission, Nottingham Trent VC Edward Peck puts the case for ranking universities’ performance in social mobility and for making access targets a part of the TEF.

Lessons from the front line of industrial strategy policy

Research, innovation and skills will all be a critical part of the government’s upcoming industrial strategy. Maddalaine Ansell worked on industrial strategy during her time in government and argues that universities must sell themselves as essential national assets for a new industrial plan.