Date Name

Why do we forget the future matters?

In the first instalment of our HE Futures series, Alister Wilson highlights just how difficult it can be for an organisation to properly focus on the future.

What about public goods in higher education?

“It is notable that high fees reduce both the net private benefits and the public benefits of higher education.” – Simon Marginson lays out some of the economic arguments for a sector finance rethink.

In defence of independent learning

With contact hours and teaching intensity in the forefront of policymaking, has the argument for independent learning been lost? George Roberts thinks not.

Digital sanctuary and anonymity on campus

Sian Bayne, in an article based on her ALTC2017 keynote, argues that anonymous social media spaces can give students the opportunity to seek the support and advice they need – but there are also risks for institutions.

A beginner’s guide to Open Access

Access to research publications is one of the key issues faced by researchers and scholarly publishers. For those new to the area, Graham Steel and David Kernohan explain.

All aboard the USS pension deficit

The USS pension fund deficit is not exactly news, but the latest round of headlines only adds to the stink of intergenerational unfairness that surrounds universities. Ant Bagshaw unpicks the numbers and the politics.

Do we need a labour theory of degree value?

When measuring the economic value of higher education we too often assume that past performance is indicative of future success. But the labour market is about to become much less predictable, argues Adam Wright.

Visions for the AlterniTEF – can we do TEF better?

Four of our wisest wonks – Smita Jamdar, Vicky Gunn, Johnny Rich, and Ant Bagshaw – answered the call to outline their AlterniTEF. Is there a better way to do teaching and student experience accountability for universities than TEF?

The case for intersectionality in TEF

The split metrics in TEF allow us to see potential issues with diverse groups, but do they go far enough? Catherine Boyd and David Kernohan consider how intersectional groups could be represented.